skulls-and-tea
I am a gay man who loves James Bond films and snooker — all kinds of working-class pursuits. I didn’t set out to deliberately respond to the masculinity [in the spy genre].

I’m fascinated that so many spies were or are gay, but I also like the idea—which John le Carré showed—that the real job is much more prosaic.

[…] Also back in the day, the natural people to approach [to recruit as spies] were people who were already lying about themselves. When homosexuality was illegal, these people already had a different identity.

What’s interesting is that simultaneously to recruiting known homosexuals, they were also perceived as a security risk, precisely because of the blackmail thing. The recruiters must have known and actually relied on it, but it was always a worry.

Mark Gatiss

(From a 2008 interview about the release of his bisexual spy Lucifer Box Trilogy novel, ‘Black Butterfly’ [x])



Thinking a lot about what blackmail material Magnussen might have had on the head of the Secret Service, and why Mycroft doesn’t have a goldfish. 

(via skulls-and-tea)

sangfroidwoolf
You know, in my twenties, I hoped we were all doomed. It seemed more glamorous. And in my thirties I definitely thought we were all doomed. In my forties I panicked that only I was doomed. And now I really have turned. Lately, I’ve been in an incredibly positive frame of mind. And that’s the only frame of mind worth having, because we are all doomed.
Fiona Shaw, in a 2009 interview with The New Statesman. (via sangfroidwoolf)
piratemoggy

When her kiss transforms the Beast, she is furious.

"You should have warned me! Here I was smitten by an exceptional being, and all of a sudden, my fiance becomes an ordinary distinguished young man!"

the 1909 play Beauty and the Beast:  Fantasy in Two Acts by Fernand Noziere, the very first published version of the story where the Beauty is disappointed when the Beast transforms into a human at the end. (via corseque)
damelola
jessehimself:

leseanthomas:
"This is what the next generation of engineers looks like
Black Girls CODE introduces young girls of color to computer programming, mobile app development, robotics and other STEM fields, so the girls can learn how to build the tools they want to see in the world. The non-profit is a global organization, with chapters in Oakland, Calif., Atlanta, New York and even South Africa, with expansion to eight more cities planned for next year. Every chapter targets girls of color between the ages of 7 and 17, formative years for capturing the girls’ interest in STEM and building their self-confidence.
"Science is magic, and our girls are opening their eyes to the fact that they can learn to become the magicians," says Bryant, who launched the company with a class of 12 girls.
But the reach of Black Girls CODE has grown exponentially in two years; the roster now exceeds 2,000 girls. Bryant was named one of the White House’s Champions for Change in the tech sector, and Black Girls Code was named one the “2012 Most Innovative Nonprofit.”
Source: http://mmxlii.com/this-is-what-the-next-generation-of-engineers-looks-like/

jessehimself:

leseanthomas:

"This is what the next generation of engineers looks like

Black Girls CODE introduces young girls of color to computer programming, mobile app development, robotics and other STEM fields, so the girls can learn how to build the tools they want to see in the world. The non-profit is a global organization, with chapters in Oakland, Calif., Atlanta, New York and even South Africa, with expansion to eight more cities planned for next year. Every chapter targets girls of color between the ages of 7 and 17, formative years for capturing the girls’ interest in STEM and building their self-confidence.

"Science is magic, and our girls are opening their eyes to the fact that they can learn to become the magicians," says Bryant, who launched the company with a class of 12 girls.

But the reach of Black Girls CODE has grown exponentially in two years; the roster now exceeds 2,000 girls. Bryant was named one of the White House’s Champions for Change in the tech sector, and Black Girls Code was named one the “2012 Most Innovative Nonprofit.”

Source: http://mmxlii.com/this-is-what-the-next-generation-of-engineers-looks-like/